Indigenous Runway Project

Nominated for Australia’s National Reconciliation Award in 2014 – the Indigenous Runway Project established in Melbourne Australia, 2012 to support emerging Aboriginal Indigenous fashion talent and designers break into the fashion industry

MAORI TELEVISION

New Plymouth is set to host the Indigenous Runway Project this afternoon.

The pōhiri for this special event will be held at midday at Owae Marae in Waitara, where designers from across the country will be formally welcomed.

Established in 2012, the event that celebrates and showcases indigenous fashion designers has made it’s way to New Zealand for the very first time.

Founder, Tina Waru says it’s an event where “kindred cultures come together to blend fashion, with culture and tradition; providing opportunities for Indigenous people.”

Not only will eager Māori designers have the opportunity to showcase their work in front of an audience, but girls from the age of 17 will also have the opportunity to join the project and learn the systems of a fashion show, from modelling, to behind the scenes work with make-up, hair, styling and even stage management.

Tina relocated to Australia as a psychologist 15 years ago where she worked with Aboriginal people.

Tina’s mother, Airihi Waru says “This Runway Project is one of the creations to come out of her (psychology) mahi, she created that to assist with the Aboriginal people she was working with at the time.”

“I think it’s a great initiative, it’s for our rangatahi – to get our rangatahi in fashion itself.  We do have a lot of rangatahi who are very keen in modelling and designing.  There’s never been a market for Māori, and it’s something that’s never seen before for indigenous people.” Tina adds.

Models will get the chance to hit the runway this Saturday July 18 at Theatre Royal in Taranaki.

For more information, please check out this link to Maori TV

POUTAMA

Over the years Poutama has supported the Maori fashion sector. Now for the first time Indigenous designers have the opportunity to share their designs with the world while the largest collection of Indigenous models gather in preparation to grace the runway with intrigue and beauty.

Aboriginal and Maori models both men and women are flying in for the runway while a third of them are training throughout Melbourne preparing for what could be a major milestone in their young lives. They meet once a week in a variety of locations to learn about the fashion industry and the art of modelling that will be put to use at the Famous Spiegel Tent during L’Oreal Fashion Week on 23 March 2013. Read More >>>

NEWS.COM.AU

SOCIALITE Brynne Edelsten has been unearthed as an unlikely mentor for indigenous youth.

Edelsten was first choice as role model for the Indigenous Fashion Unearthed program, providing young people with opportunities to learn about the fashion world. “I try to pick things that I do feel some connection to, even if I don’t understand the connection, so I was really drawn to this program,” Edelsten said. “A lot of the kids have moved from home to do this and I have moved from home, too. “They want to make people aware of their culture and I came from America, which isn’t too different from Australia, but is a different culture. Read More >>>

SPASIFIK MAG

The world of fashion is set to be captivated by striking collections created by Indigenous designers and worn by the largest gathering of Indigenous models, whose intrigue and alluring beauty will grace the Indigenous Runway at the famous Spiegel Tent on 23 March 2013 during this year’s L’Oreal Fashion Week in Melbourne. This is fashion history in the making as Indigenous cultures from Australia and New Zealand prepare for the opportunity to share their talent as part of a cultural programme offered exclusively by L’Oreal. This Trans-Tasman collaboration will see Aboriginal and Maori designers and models land in Melbourne specifically for this event, Read More >>>

MIMI DESIGNS

Indigenous Fashion Unearthed

I have also just returned from Melbourne where I had an absolute ball. I was involved in the wonderful Indigenous Fashion Unearthed.  This is a project promoting Aboriginal and Maori culture within the fashion industry. It was an initiative created to provide a platform for young indigenous people who have a talents and a passion for fashion! Check out the super models of tomorrow displaying some of my work. Read More >>>

3 THINGS

The fashion world is set to be captivated this coming weekend by the largest gathering of Indigenous designers and models ever to grace the runway and steal the show at this year’s L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival. This is fashion history in the making as Indigenous cultures from Australia and New Zealand will display their work as part of the Fashion Festival’s Cultural Program. The event is a one-of-a-kind, where neighbouring cultures come together to blend fashion and tradition, simultaneously providing a platform for Aboriginal and Maori designers, models, makeup artists and hairstylists to showcase their talents. Read More >>>

DEADLY VIBE

Indigenous Designers and Models from Australia and New Zealand

Create History at L’Oreal Fashion Week

Melbourne, VIC

Fashion history was made as the largest gathering of Aboriginal and Maori designers/models graced the catwalk at the famous Spiegel tent in Melbourne during the 2013 L’Oreal Fashion Week.   This Trans-Tasman collaboration between Aboriginal and Maori designers/models showcased the diversity of Indigenous talent that explores culture through fashion and design. Read More >>>

WORLD NEWS AUSTRALIA

Maori and Aboriginal designers and models have showcased the first ever Indigenous runway event this weekend, at the famous Spiegel tent in Melbourne. The event is part of a series of collaborations called ‘Unearthed’, created by Palawa man Wayne Qulliam and Maori women Tina Waru and Erica Lambert, to unite the two cultures. The trio designed Unearthed as a way to unite Indigenous cultures from across the Tasman, but also to bring recognition to naturally artistic members of the community. “This whole program is about empowering our communities. When we worked alongside our Aboriginal communities,  we were able to look at it together to take it and share this program with them worldwide,” Ms Waru said.  Read More >>>

ARTS HUB

Indigenous fashion has been growing slowly and Indigenous Fashion Unearthedaims to help indigenous young people gain work experience and exposure in the fashion industry, whether it be in design, modeling, make-up or hairstyle. Still in their infant stages, their premier fashion show was in 2012.   Some of this year’s Indigenous Runway are Indigenous designers Colleen Tighe Johnson; Eva Wanganeen; Mia Brennan & Lucy Simpson; Darren and Tania Dunn; Lenore Dembski; Chantal Cook; Damien Loizou (Walya Altjerre); Shona Tawhiao; Jeanine Clarkin; Maehe Tamihana; Dmonic Intent; Keri Wanoa and Hemi Sundgren (Whiri); and Batreece Poto Morgan. Their cultural collections are unique and they hope that fashion trends worldwide will begin to notice aspects of Indigenous design. Read More >>>

LOREAL

The world of fashion is set to be captivated by striking collections created by Indigenous designers and worn by the largest gathering of Indigenous models, whose intrigue and alluring beauty will grace the Indigenous Runway at the famous Spiegeltent on 23 March 2013 during this year’s L’Oréal Melbourne Fashion Festival. This is fashion history in the making as Indigenous cultures from Australia and New Zealand prepare for the opportunity to share their talent as part of the L’Oréal Melbourne Fashion Festival’s Cultural Program.Read More >>>

ARTS CENTRE MELBOURNE

Indigenous Fashion Runway

A participant of the 2013 L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival Cultural Program

This event promotes Indigenous fashion where kindred cultures come together to blend fashion, with culture and tradition and provides a platform for Aboriginal and Maori fashion designers, models, makeup artists and hairstylists to showcase their works.

This fashion runway was inspired by a unique initiative created to provide a pathway for Aboriginal and Maori young people wanting to work in the fashion industry. The initiative Indigenous Fashion Unearthed provided opportunities for Indigenous young people to be trained, mentored and gain work experience in the industry having participated in their first fashion show in 2012. The program continues to empower Indigenous young people to reach their aspirations in the fashion and arts industry. Read More >>>

Press Releases…

Its Founder Tina Waru comes from a strong lineage of pioneers such as her late grandfather Sonny Waru notable Actor, Orator & NZ Cultural Consultant, Uncle Selwyn Muru Maori Painter, Sculptor, Writer and Film Maker, and the late Hanna Jackson (Aunty), Evan Eriwata (Aunty), and Uncle’s Steve & Pat Heremaia who established Aotearoa’s first Maori fashion show and committee in the late 70’s. Tina first worked in the fashion industry as a makeup artist and had focused on a career in performing arts.  She later went on to complete postgraduate qualifications in Psychology and Maori Health and spent over 15 years working in the field of health and education.

Rave Reviews…

The Indigenous Runway Project originally known by other names such as Indigenous Talent Unearthed, Indigenous Fashion Unearthed had emerged from a makeup workshop for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.  There was a growing need to empower Indigenous young people with confidence, motivation and pride so that they are able to embrace their hidden beauty and talent and explore career pathways in various areas of fashion, modelling, fashion design, performing arts, production, hair and makeup and styling.

NORTHERN STAR AFTER

Rave reviews at Melbourne’s Indigenous Fashion Unearthed runway on Saturday, Suffolk Park designer Mia Brennan believes that indigenous fashion is on the brink of a renaissance. However, according to the show’s founders, indigenous designers may be picked up internationally before they are embraced on home turf. Part of L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival’s Cultural Program, the show brought together kindred cultures, providing a platform for Aboriginal and Maori fashion designers, models, make-up artists and hairstylists to showcase their works at Melbourne’s famous Spiegeltent. Read More >>>

KOORI MAIL

Top line-up for Unearthed fashion parade. PUTTING their best foot forward (and back) before strutting the catwalk in Melbourne last month were models from the inaugural Indigenous Fashion Unearthed event. Co-founded by Aboriginal photographer Wayne Quilliam and Maori women Tina Waru and Erica Lambert, the event at the famous Spiegeltent was part of the 2013 L’Oreal Fashion Week and is believed to have been the largest gathering of Australian and New Zealand Indigenous designers and models. Read More >>>

NITV

Aboriginal and Maori models will fly in for the runway while a third of them are training throughout Melbourne preparing for what could be a major milestone in their young lives. They meet once a week in a variety of locations to learn about the fashion industry and the art of modelling that will be put to use at the Famous Spiegel Tent during L’Oreal Fashion Week on 23 March 2013. The hosts for the fashion runway are Luke Carroll a television and film actor and first ever Indigenous male presenter on much loved children’s television program “Playschool”  Read More >>>

LATERAL LOVE

Maori and Aboriginal designers and models have showcased the first ever Indigenous runway event this weekend, at the famous Spiegel tent in Melbourne. The event is part of a series of collaborations called ‘Unearthed’, created by Palawa man Wayne Qulliam and Maori women Tina Waru and Erica Lambert, to unite the two cultures. The trio designed Unearthed as a way to unite Indigenous cultures from across the Tasman, but also to bring recognition to naturally artistic members of the community.  Read More >>>

SIRRIS

Indigenous Fashion Unearthed provides Maori and Indigenous people the opportunity  to be trained and mentored, to gain experience in the industry. It’s all part of the L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festivals Cultural program.The showcase is on the 23rd March and is in its second year. After a previous life of working on hair and styling shoots to gaining a degree in photography and creating my own fashion label, I feel like I’m almost coming full circle, or should I say finally making sense of where my experience has led me.  Read More >>>

EARTH E-MAG

Embracing one’s cultural heritage and discovering one’s place can be exhilarating or darn right scary but having great leaders and mentors along the way creates that sense of purpose. Such a journey, our journey, started three years ago when we developed the Indigenous Fashion Unearthed (IFU). Read More >>>

FROCK PAPER SCISSORS

Reading from Page 67….

One of Australia’s best kept fashion secrets was revealed at the L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival this year. Collections from Indigenous Australian and New Zealand designers were showcased, fusing thousands of years of tradition with contemporary fashions in the festival’s first ever all-Indigenous runway event. Read More >>>

THE AUSTRALIAN

THE Central Australian desert and Alaskan oil rigs are not environments generally associated with high fashion, but Indigenous Fashion Unearthed has been trying to change that since starting up in Melbourne’s western suburbs three years ago.  Read More >>>

AUSTRALIA PLUS

Kindred cultures come together to blend fashion with culture and tradition in Indigenous Fashion Unearthed, part of Melbourne Spring Fashion Week. Pawi Wynyard and Tracey Brown are designers with the label Te Whare A Rangi. Their designs draw from their Maori heritage and blend traditional and contemporary materials and style. Read More >>>

PEPPERMINT

Want to be part of a moment in fashion history? Head along to Melbourne’s Famous Spiegeltent on March 23 for the Indigenous Runway as part of L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival. Indigenous designers from Australia will be joined by their Maori counterparts from over the Tasman in this collaborative event, which is an initiative of the Indigenous Fashion Unearthed program. The morning will kick off with a runway show featuring indigenous models wearing garments made using native fibres and haute couture-level traditional weaving, alongside pieces created from contemporary fabrics and modern techniques. Read More >>>

Behind the Scenes…

From a small group of volunteers to a large team of Aboriginal and fashion experts; the Indigenous Runway Project continues to provide a mentoring model that responds to community needs and develops leadership capacity providing structured support to help Indigenous young people to define their own careers in the fashion industry.

To date, Indigenous Runway Project has reached other global Indigenous communities such as New Zealand, Arizona, Canada and Africa.  Since 2012 we have received over 1500 expressions of interest, inspiring hundreds of established and emerging Indigenous fashion talent and designers. In 2014, the world’s first Global Indigenous Management (GIM) arose from the project providing a sustainable solution for its unfunded Project and a platform for Indigenous young people across the globe to help showcase their fashion, talent, beauty, creative and artistic skills to the world.